One Day Braddah

By Marlone Balason

(Hawaiian Pidgin English is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi)

Me, I one local boy, born and raised Hawaii. Pidgin is how I talk evah since small kid times, up until now da pidgin still come out even tho I no steh dea right now, especially if get guys from da ainas come up hea to Alaska for vacation.

Dis year da Church go be 50 years ol in da West. Me, born in da Church too. Can still remembah how was befo on Oahu when we was small. Ony had lilbit locales. No mo chapels yet, we steh renting.

I still remembah seeing mah faddah an unko dem pushing all the white long tables and setting em up for worship service then wen church pau we gotta put em back to how was cuz had school da next day. I remembah how da old man from da school who open da door for us look like and always asking if we pau yet.

I remembah nevah had planny ministers too only had lilibit. When we went school and church stuff come up, I remembah my friends ask, “What Church you go? “ I say “Iglesia Ni Cristo, cuz,” Den dey ask, “Whea dat?” I remembah I had hard time saying, “Oh we use da school right now,” Cause I know they go say anykine like, “Yoa church steh school? How dat true church?” Every time I went hear dat I steh saying inside, “One day braddah, watch you guys go see we go get chapels all ovah, we go have planny ministers too, watch one day braddah.”

Fast forward to now, da stuff I was thinking about when I was small kid time, dat one day go get planny chapels Hawaii, look now, get. One day go get planny ministers, look now, get. God’s mercy and kokua I one minister today, actually da first dat joined da ministry from the local of Ewa Beach and da first to be ordained from the local of Ewa Beach. And now the local of Ewa beach, dat not only da local I came from but also wea I went grow up steh building the House of Worship in the year of the 50th anniversary in the. Wen I see all dat I say to myself, see em, told you braddah, one day braddah, one day.

I’m a local boy born and raised in Hawaii. Pidgin was how I spoke ever since I was a small kid; until now the pidgin still comes out even though I don’t live in Hawaii anymore, especially if friends from the islands come up to Alaska (where I am now), for vacation.

This year the Church will be 50 years old out in the West. I was born in the Church. I can still remember how it was before on Oahu when we were small. There were a few local congregations and no chapels yet.

I still remember seeing my father and uncle pushing all the white long tables and setting them up for worship service then when it was done we put them back because it was going to be used at the school the next day. I remember how the man from the school who opens the door for us was always asking if we were done yet.

I remember not having a lot of ministers, only a few. When we went to school and Church came up, I remember my friends would ask, “What church do you go to?” And I’d say, “Iglesia Ni Cristo, the true Church. Then they would ask, “Where’s that?” I remember I had a hard time saying, “Oh we use a school right now,” because I know they would say something like, “Your church is in a school? How is that the true church?” Every time I heard that I kept saying, “One day brother, watch, you’ll see we’re gonna have chapels all over and have a lot of ministers too, one day.”

Fast forward to now, all the things I was thinking about when I was a small kid, like having a lot of chapels in Hawaii, now we have it. I knew one day we would have a lot of ministers, now we have it. With God’s mercy and help, I’m a minister today – the first one to join the ministry from the local of Ewa Beach, which is not only the local that I came from, but which will also have a chapel dedicated in the year of the 50th anniversary of the Church’s establishment in the West. When I see all this I tell myself, “See I told you, one day brother, one day…”

 

Browse Stories by Category

One Day Braddah

By Marlone Balason

(Hawaiian Pidgin English is an English-based creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi)

Me, I one local boy, born and raised Hawaii. Pidgin is how I talk evah since small kid times, up until now da pidgin still come out even tho I no steh dea right now, especially if get guys from da ainas come up hea to Alaska for vacation.

Dis year da Church go be 50 years ol in da West. Me, born in da Church too. Can still remembah how was befo on Oahu when we was small. Ony had lilbit locales. No mo chapels yet, we steh renting.

I still remembah seeing mah faddah an unko dem pushing all the white long tables and setting em up for worship service then wen church pau we gotta put em back to how was cuz had school da next day. I remembah how da old man from da school who open da door for us look like and always asking if we pau yet.

I remembah nevah had planny ministers too only had lilibit. When we went school and church stuff come up, I remembah my friends ask, “What Church you go? “ I say “Iglesia Ni Cristo, cuz,” Den dey ask, “Whea dat?” I remembah I had hard time saying, “Oh we use da school right now,” Cause I know they go say anykine like, “Yoa church steh school? How dat true church?” Every time I went hear dat I steh saying inside, “One day braddah, watch you guys go see we go get chapels all ovah, we go have planny ministers too, watch one day braddah.”

Fast forward to now, da stuff I was thinking about when I was small kid time, dat one day go get planny chapels Hawaii, look now, get. One day go get planny ministers, look now, get. God’s mercy and kokua I one minister today, actually da first dat joined da ministry from the local of Ewa Beach and da first to be ordained from the local of Ewa Beach. And now the local of Ewa beach, dat not only da local I came from but also wea I went grow up steh building the House of Worship in the year of the 50th anniversary in the. Wen I see all dat I say to myself, see em, told you braddah, one day braddah, one day.

I’m a local boy born and raised in Hawaii. Pidgin was how I spoke ever since I was a small kid; until now the pidgin still comes out even though I don’t live in Hawaii anymore, especially if friends from the islands come up to Alaska (where I am now), for vacation.

This year the Church will be 50 years old out in the West. I was born in the Church. I can still remember how it was before on Oahu when we were small. There were a few local congregations and no chapels yet.

I still remember seeing my father and uncle pushing all the white long tables and setting them up for worship service then when it was done we put them back because it was going to be used at the school the next day. I remember how the man from the school who opens the door for us was always asking if we were done yet.

I remember not having a lot of ministers, only a few. When we went to school and Church came up, I remember my friends would ask, “What church do you go to?” And I’d say, “Iglesia Ni Cristo, the true Church. Then they would ask, “Where’s that?” I remember I had a hard time saying, “Oh we use a school right now,” because I know they would say something like, “Your church is in a school? How is that the true church?” Every time I heard that I kept saying, “One day brother, watch, you’ll see we’re gonna have chapels all over and have a lot of ministers too, one day.”

Fast forward to now, all the things I was thinking about when I was a small kid, like having a lot of chapels in Hawaii, now we have it. I knew one day we would have a lot of ministers, now we have it. With God’s mercy and help, I’m a minister today – the first one to join the ministry from the local of Ewa Beach, which is not only the local that I came from, but which will also have a chapel dedicated in the year of the 50th anniversary of the Church’s establishment in the West. When I see all this I tell myself, “See I told you, one day brother, one day…”

 

Browse Stories by Category

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *